Monday, May 6, 2019

May 2019 post


Today I’d like to talk about a passion I have: journaling. 

I've been writing in a journal (diary) since I was a little girl. I liked to put my thoughts on paper, especially when I was angry, sad or happy--in other words when emotional about what was going on in my life.  It was a safe place. I could call it like I saw it without anyone putting in her own two cents.

I'm still doing the same, but with an added twist. I've added art to my words. I've also created many journals on different subjects. No longer a place to vent my emotions, my journals take me on different types of journeys. Let's see, I have journals on:

Nature
I mostly cover my backyard and parks with animals, flowers, trees, people, and verbal observations. The one major observation I can share is that when sitting in a natural setting, you become part of the landscape. Amazingly, all sorts of animals and activity occur just by sitting there. As I always tell my students, "Be still and they will come."



From my backyard journal



Travel
Wherever I go, so goes my sketchbook. As I have covered in previous blogs, I carry a small sketchbook in order to capture moments with word and drawing. It's amazing how much one can recall a moment in time when sitting on a curb sketching years ago. Suddenly you are back there with the breeze in the air, the children messing about, traffic coming and going, people walking by. I've never experienced that with a photo. As I said, it like your have truly grabbed a timeless moment in your life! That's why I'm addicted to it.



Travel in San Francisco



Animals
Okay, I'm a bit of a nut regarding birds. No, I'm not a birder at all. I just love watching and drawing them. My small backyard has nine feeders, two bird baths and a pond. We've been able to attract all sorts of birds and behavior. What a wonderful setting to enjoy these little creatures. Yes, I do have one journal specifically dedicated to birds, which is almost full.

Animals (of course a bird)

I'm not stuck exclusively on birds though. I thoroughly enjoy downloading some photos (from places like Morguefile or Pixabay) and spending time on different animals: lions, tigers, sea turtles, roosters, camels and so on. (I haven't created one dedicated journal to animals in general, but will probably do so this spring or summer).  What's especially fun about journaling animals is that you can find all sorts of information about them in order to add to your enrichment and writing.

Art Journal
I also call this one my ad hoc or visual journal. It's my favorite. I can do whatever I feel like doing. No restrictions or themes. Because I put anything and everything in this book, I am usually restricted to my studio because most of my supplies are there.

With this journal, the sky is the limit. You're not bound by drawing, sketching or writing, you can now use visual objects to tell your story or express your feelings. Here's a short list.
  • paintings (your own are best)
  • collages
  •  magazine cut outs
  •  photos
  • found items: washi tape, stamps, fabric, post cards
  • maps
  • music sheets
  • envelopes for secret messages
  • specialized paper
Unlike the written-only journal where the words matter the most, the art journal takes on a life of its own. Several visual journalers will say they don’t know why they pick a picture or a piece of fabric to express themselves. But once done, they are certain it was the right choice for that day, for that hour, that moment.

Additionally, this journal takes all sorts of media, such as acrylic paint, watercolor, colored pencil, marker, ink, gold leafing and more! Paste a favorite card down and surround it with everything you can find or desire. It's truly art for art's sake--no entering of competitions, no sales, no markets, no galleries. Just a place for you to be truly raw in your creativity.

Emotional Reasons
A few years ago, I was teaching art journaling at St. Vincent's hospital to cancer survivors. Through the help of my own counselor, I had started a "cancer" journal to help me get through the difficulties. I called it My Garden. Here's my first page:

My first ever visual journal page


Wow, I haven't read this page for awhile, but gosh it really sends me back 14 years ago, especially these quotes:
"This is my life's garden. A metaphor for my new life after cancer." 
 And then on the next page,
"Now more than ever, I want to live life at the fullest. ... Now I can greet each day with a sense of adventure!... My garden is filled with hope. I survived on hope and it's given me wings."
As I progressed with each page, then book, I changed, helping me with my "new normal." But what happened in the class was even more phenomenal. I saw women, who was darkly depressed, spring to life as we cut, pasted, wrote, searched for that right paper, photos, paint. Over time, I witnessed people coming to terms with problems (physical, emotional or even spiritually) and most importantly, they were growing.

Since those days at the hospital I've continued to journal--either thematically as described above or through a general art journal. I find a magical life inside my pages. Not only do I continue to learn more about myself, I am finding my creativity has exploded. I'm trying out new media, new avenues, new techniques, even working on eventual paintings. Here are a few examples of my current work--all originating from a blank book:






It is truly amazing what happens when you start to journal either thematically as I've covered above or through a general art journal. Lives change. Yes! You can be creative again and forever.

Here's an interesting trailer clip of the video 1000 Journal. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do. 




What's coming up!

Glastonbury Studios Classes

Just a warning. The students in these classes are 
very liberal-minded, fun-loving women!
Be prepared to laugh, love and live a lot.

New classes begin the week of May 19th. If you want to join us, please contact me: jjgoodell@gmail.com

Art of Sketching  Begins 5/21
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun. We'll be  using pen and ink with watercolor washes. 
People: faces, in motion, about town
Limited supply list
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

The Morning Draw Begins 5/22
We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques. 
Faces: people and animals
Limited supply list.
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term

Afternoon Art Journaling Begins 5/22
Drawing, painting, collage, writing, mixed media. 
Includes most supplies. 
Every Wednesday afternoon
1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
$80 per five-week term

One-Day Workshops

All of our workshops are held at Glastonbury Studios in Tigard from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., unless otherwise indicated. Workshops include most supplies and lunch. Cost $90 per person, per day. Pre-registration is required. Seats are limited to a minimum of four students.

To learn more about the offerings and dates, go to my website. To register or for more information, contact me at: jjgoodell@gmail.com


Saturday, May 18
Drawing with Colored Pencils

Saturday, June 1
Discover Watercolor Pencil 

Saturday, June 22
Drawing Cats 

Saturday, July 13
Drawing Fun Bugs


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New!
Two-Day Workshop
Saturday August 3-4
"Art Journaling from the Heart" 
$199 
 Glastonbury Studios in Tigard from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(includes materials, light breakfast, lunch)
Location: In-studio
Maximum: 10 students

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Future Sketch'n on the Go Workshops
Currently I am looking at two locations to travel with students in 2020. (Yes, I do work this far in advance.) One is Japan and the other is Aix en Provence, France. Both places have wonderful sketching opportunities. If you are interested, please let me know. It will help in my decision-making.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

April Newsletter. Artists contribute more to society than we give them credit.



I was listening to a radio program a few weeks ago and heard this:

"How can you do art when there is such suffering in the world?" 

My answer:
How can I breath?
How can I eat?
How can I do anything?

Over the years, I've heard what she was saying in one form or another. For many people art is simply fun, not serious stuff. We artists shouldn't be so inconsiderate by playing when outside our front doors, there is so much misery. 

I can only think that this person has never really studied Art (with a capital A). Or maybe she doesn't understand what Art is. So let's start there. According to Britannica, there are eight categories of Art: 

  • Literature: the written word, poetry, drama, story, etc.
  • Visual arts: painting, drawing, sculpture
  • Graphic arts: also painting, drawing, design for more commercial purposes
  • Sculpture: three-dimensional works in clay, wax, stone, metal, fabric,glass, wood, plaster and so on.
  • Decorative: enamel work, woodwork, furniture, mosaic
  • Performing: drama, dance, theater
  • Music: composition (singing, dancing, etc)
  • Architecture: including interior and/or industrial design 
Every single one of these disciplines require hard work. I don't know any professional who would say it's all fun and games. While artists are passionate about what they do and hopefully have fun, it's still difficult at times.

Look at that list again, each requires a skill that has to be honed over time. For example, let's take writing. When I was working in San Jose at the dawn of the Silicone Valley explosion in the 80s, there were all sorts of jobs for writers. Why? Because engineers aren't typically known for their writing skills. I was able to plug up the holes.


Geniuses understand it's more than math

Even Steve Jobs recognized that artists are needed when creating the new. He hired all sorts of people to work for him: musicians, zoologists, artists, poets and so on. He realized that it's not only a technician who develops a product, but a string of people. Consider how beautiful his machines have been, even his Iphone is sleek and cool! He was an artist, just like Leonardo da Vinci was a engineer.

Speaking of engineers, Albert Einstein once said, "A society’s competitive advantage will come not from how well its schools teach the multiplication and periodic tables, but from how well they stimulate imagination and creativity."  He's got a good point.


For the moment, just look around you. Everything we use was once in the hands of a designer-- from the computer, tablet or phone to the toaster that pops out your toast each morning. They all started with a visual plan and from there you had writers dealing with instructions, not to mention the marketing side that hires plenty of artists each year. It seems Art matters.


STEM needs STEAM

I was rather annoyed a few years ago when I learned about the STEM movement. The
acronym stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The main purpose is to prepare our students for the tech jobs of the present and future. Leonardo da Vinci would probably be scratching his head wondering what in the world does that mean? That's because science and art worked hand-in-hand in those days. 

My annoyance came from the lack of Humanities in the equation. As Einstein says, how are we supposed to be truly competitive without the written word, visual arts, drama, architecture and dare I say, plain old civics and history. I totally agree with Einstein--he was a genius in more than one sense. He knew you must cultivate the creative side alongside of the linear.


Fortunately, I've recently heard the idea has been changed to STEAM, including art. That's great because I understand we must address the high-tech issues today to prepare our students but we cannot sacrifice the Humanities in the process. We still needs writers, artists, musicians, good citizens as well as welders, carpenters, drivers, craftsmen, only to name a few. It's all part of the entire fabric of our society.


But come on, art is fun!

One of the fallacies I usually run up against is that art is fun, so it just can't possibly be work.  For example, I met a guy who said to me, "Well you don't' have a real job." And this guy had a girlfriend who was a teacher. But because I teach art to adults, I wasn't doing anything important and probably having way too much fun to call it a job. I should have asked him to draw a realistic portrait to see how much fun he would have. More than likely, he'd just stare at me.


Okay, so this is the reality of being an artist. It seems a waste to so many or just fun. The weird thing is I was on my way to teach basic drawing to students at our local community college when I heard the statement above. I immediately thought, why would 18 people sign up for a class during times like these? Of course, they would and continue to do so because art doesn't negate the present problems. It helps us to cope.

To me, art is more than me touching paper with either a visual statement or written word, it's a way of life--during good times or bad. Full stop. And for those who cannot imagine how we can express ourselves during times like these, I ask how can we not? It's better than drugs and alcohol any day.

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 What's coming up!
Spring 2019 
One-Day Workshops

All of our one-day workshops are held at Glastonbury Studios in Tigard from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., unless otherwise indicated. Workshops include most supplies and lunch. Cost $90 per person, per day. Pre-registration is required. Seats are limited to a minimum of four students.

To learn more about the offerings and dates, go to my website. To register or for more information, contact me at: jjgoodell@gmail.com


Saturday, April 27
Drawing Birds  

Saturday, May 18
Drawing with Colored Pencils 

Saturday, June 1
Discover Watercolor Pencil 

Saturday, June 22
Drawing Cats 


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Sketch'n-on-the-Go Series™
Presents
"Sketching Dublin & Beyond"



Sunday, September 1- Sunday, September 8, 2019
Eight Days & Seven Nights Workshop
Tuition: $800*  
Interested? 
For more information go to:
Dublin Workshop
Only two spaces available

Contact me:

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Studio Classes

Just a warning. The students in these classes are 
very liberal-minded, fun-loving women!

Be prepared to laugh, love and live a lot.

New classes begin the second week of April. If you want to join us, please contact me: jjgoodell@gmail.com

Art of Sketching  Begins 4/9
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun. We'll be  using pen and ink with watercolor washes. Limited supply list
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

The Morning Draw Begins 4/10
We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques. Limited supply list.
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term


Art Journaling has been suspended until later this year.

Rene Magritte, Golconda, oil painting, 1953.

“Art evokes the mystery without which the world would not exist…” ~ Rene Magritte

Sunday, March 3, 2019

March Newsletter

Creative Minds have always been known 
to survive any kind of bad training.
Anna Freud

When I try to be creative, I usually fail. That's because creativity can't just be turned on and off. If I muse on what one of my instructors once said, noodle a thought around in my head, I find inspiration. But what works best is to let the thought rest and out of blue (usually in the shower), the idea comes to me.

Now how in the world do you teach this thought process in an academic setting. It doesn't really fall into the mix very well. Maybe that's why so many "geniuses" haven't done so well in school. The list includes some surprises including Thomas Jefferson, Issac Newton, Charles Dickens (left school at 12), John D Rockefeller, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Bill Gates, Steven Jobs, Elton John and so on. In fact, for every CEO with a 4.0 GPA, there are scores more with lower grades.

How come? According to Ilya Pozin (founder of Pluto TV), "A GPA does not measure a person's emotional intelligence, it does not measure their leadership ability, it does not necessarily measure their ability to think outside of the box and solve problems." It shows you're bright and that you've worked hard, but not necessarily the end-all to things. You will most likely move on to great accomplishments, but those of us left behind also have a lot to contribute. 

So what does this have to do with art and creativity. We often look at the greats or even the leading local artists who get into art shows and think, "I'll never do that; I'll never be that creative." And I will ask, "Why not?" 

As a skilled-based instructor I push learning the fundamentals in drawing and painting.Once that's accomplished, the whole world is opened to you, if you just believe in yourself and your skills. Here are few of my art principles I teach students:

  • Get trained--stick with teachers who will take the time to teach you step by step. Read books that show how to advance your skills, media knowledge.
  • Practice--you'll get no where if you don't practice everyday. Full stop.
  • Commit yourself to your skill--along with practice, you must be committed to your craft.
  • Learn from others--you will find students in museums copying masters' works, best way to learn techniques. It takes study but you become aware of the techniques and "talents" of others.
  • Work out the details--that is, create visual thoughts/notes by developing preliminary drawings. Michelangelo would create 100-150 drawings before he struck stone.
  • Walk away from your work and come back later--you'll see where you need to make changes. It will help you to know when and where to stop.
  • Most importantly, do not fear making bad art, embrace whatever you create because it's all part of a learning process!!
I truly believe that creativity comes when you just let go, hear your muse and strike. As crazy as an idea may seem, why not put it down on paper or canvas. Go for it and see where it leads. If you don't like it, throw it away or stash it in a art idea file (I do that) for later idea brainstorming. By the way, that works more times than not. 

One final word: 
Believe in your inner artist and throw away the inner critic!

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What's coming up!

Studio Workshops
All studio workshops are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Includes most supplies and lunch. Sign up early. Most workshops fill up quickly.The cost is $90. Class size is limited to ten students. Pre-registration is required. Only payment reserves your seat.

Saturday March 23
Drawing the Face
One-Day Workshop
In this workshop we will explore all types of faces, including humans and other animals. I will show you how to truly see the face, use facial measurements to gain a likeness, develop shading to create form and how to draw realistic hair/fur/feathers. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mixed Media with you to class and I’ll supply the rest, including lunch.  Contact me for registration materials at jjgoodell@gmail.com




Sketch'n-on-the-Go Series™
Presents
"Sketching Dublin & Beyond"



Sunday, September 1- Sunday, September 8, 2019
Eight Days & Seven Nights Workshop
Tuition: $800*  
Interested? 
Go to Dublin Workshop.
Two spaces availableContact me:

+++++++++++++++++++++
Studio Classes
Due to personal problems of late, the winter/spring classes are beginning next week. If you want to join us, please contact me: jjgoodell@gmail.com. There are seats available.

Art of Sketching 3/5
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun. We'll be  using pen and ink with watercolor washes. Limited supply list
The Landscape
(ink and watercolor)
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

The Morning Draw 3/6
We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques. Limited supply list.
The Landscape
(oil pastels, ink and watercolor)
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

Art Journaling has been suspended until later this year.


Sunday, February 3, 2019

February 2019 Newsletter

My little, very small sketchbook
and how it solves lots of daily art issues


Back a few years ago, when I was teaching sketching in England, one of my students whispered in my ear that several of her classmates were really intimidated by their sketchbook. Although I was a bit surprised, I actually knew what she meant. I've been there. Sometimes it's just hard to start. If you're a writer or an artist, the white sheet or canvas is difficult to face. What's more, even when you do start, you worry it's not good enough.


To my delight the whisperer suggested, I come up with a "sloppy copy" booklet that students could just scribble in. But more importantly, feel free to put pencil to paper, not actually caring if the sketch becomes a Rembrandt or a child-like rendering. At the time, I thought it was a good idea and filed it away.


Fast forward to last year when my husband and I were in Barcelona. Of course, I brought all my sketching stuff, which I carried in my purse. Then one day, I passed by a shop that was selling Barcelona souvenirs, among them a a small sketchbook. Hmm. I bought it and proceeded to do all my work, in pencil, for the rest of the vacation.



Barcelona sketchbook

One of my sketches--very loose indeed

Happily, I made a new discovery. Not only was I stripped of that concern that my sketchbook wouldn't look good enough, I was freed up to do anything I wanted. All of my sketches didn't take more than 15 minutes to finish and at that, I'd say most of them were only five minutes or less. The sketchbook was small enough for a pocket and accompanied by a mechanical pencil, I was set to sketch whatever and whenever I wanted.  No matter if I were on a bus, train or boat, I could pull it out and start sketching. I was in love! (okay, I spread my love around for all kinds of things--people, objects, food, dogs...)


With this practice in hand, I bought everyone 
 who took my Canadian sketching workshop a similar small sketchbook (3.5 x 5.5, 24 pages).  I can only say we all experienced so much freedom! For me, I actually filled up the entire book with quick drawings and lots of short reminder notes. I believe everyone did the same. 

Later on in the week, we all gathered in a room on the ship (it was a cruise) and spent six hours working on our "real" journals, redrawing the scene(s), inking and using watercolor washes. The secret to the success was that we all took a picture first of everything we were drawing, then did a quick sketch. When we sat down to record everything in our sketching journals it was far less intimidating because we were recounting our adventure from previously made rough sketches.




You can probably see above why taking a photo is so important. My quick sketch of Ben Franklin's grave monument was very short and fat. But by referring back to my photo I saw the true proportion. Using both references allowed me to create a very pleasing sketch.



There are lots of small sketchbooks on the market.

Of course, there are lot of choices. I like using the Moleskine book with a brown craft cover. They come in packs of three, which can easily cover three trips or just daily sketching. It comes with a small envelope in the back for small items such as tickets, and receipts of little items one picks up along the way.
I also sketch in field books or pocket notebooks, which are used a lot by scientists and other professionals for field work. The books usually have a ruler printed inside and other notations. They come in three and five packets and can be filled with blank, graph or dotted line paper.





Finally, I use a couple of thicker books, especially in my purse for when I get bored in the doctor's office, waiting for someone or going on a short trip. My favorites are Daler Rowney, which is really inexpensive at Walmart and Moleskine. They both have at least 70-80 pages, 32# paper, an internal pocket, ribbon bookmark and elastic closure. These are sturdier than the paper covered books.



In my classes, I now give every student one of the smaller sketchbooks. The homework is to sketch one item per week--nothing complicated, just a quick visual note. We're also learning how to sketch in one-minute, two minute, three-minute sequences. It's amazing how quickly your internal critic disappears when there is little time to "bad-mouth" your work.

This may all sound silly, but I suggest you buy one of the small sketchbooks and sketch something everyday in pencil. You'll surprise yourself how good you will get.

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What's coming up!!


Seats available in all classes and workshops. 

Workshop Opportunities

Glastonbury Studios One-Day Workshops
All studio workshops are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Includes most supplies and lunch. Sign up early. Most workshops fill up quickly.The cost is $90. Class size is limited to ten students. Pre-registration is required. Only payment reserves your seat.


Saturday, February 9
Drawing Birds
Here’s an introductory course to sketching birds from skeleton to feather. We’ll cover many different birds, using pencil, ink and watercolor wash. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mix Media with you to class. All other supplies, including lunch, provided.

Saturday March 23
Drawing the Face
One-Day Workshop
In this workshop we will explore all types of faces, including humans and other animals. I will show you how to truly see the face, use facial measurements to gain a likeness, develop shading to create form and how to draw realistic hair/fur/feathers. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mixed Media with you to class and I’ll supply the rest, including lunch.


*****************************************

Sketch'n-on-the-Go Series™
Presents
"Sketching Dublin & Beyond"



Sunday, September 1- Sunday, September 8, 2019
Eight Days & Seven Nights Workshop
Tuition: $800*  
Interested? 
Go to Dublin Workshop.

Contact me:

Winter 2019 Classes 


Just a warning. The students in these classes are 
very liberal-minded, fun-loving women!
Be prepared to laugh, love and live a lot.

Classes begin week of February 17. Come join the fun, while learning how to draw and/or paint in the Glastonbury Studios classes. To sign up for classes in my studio, please email me at jjgoodell@gmail.com. Five-week term; limited to eight students per class. Only registration and payment secures your seat.





Art of Sketching 2/19
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun. We'll be  using pen and ink with watercolor washes. Limited supply list
The Landscape
(ink and watercolor)
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

The Morning Draw 2/20
We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques. Limited supply list.
The Landscape
(oil pastels, ink and watercolor)
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available
Page from Art Journal
Art Journaling  2/21
Drawing, painting, collage, writing, mixed media. Limited supply list.
Every Thursday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

For more information email:
jjgoodell@gmail.com


 “Every artist was first an amateur”

Ralph Waldo Emerson