Thursday, January 5, 2017

Two-point perspective

Now that you understand one-point perspective (see last two posts), it should be easier to understand two point. The best way to explain when to use two-point is when you see a corner facing you--a building, a book, a box--you're looking at two planes that have two vanishing points relative to the horizon line. For instance, notice the building below. We are looking at the corner and it is above the horizon line.



When constructing such a building on paper, you first determine the horizon line and then the vanishing points. In this example your vanishing points are way outside the photograph. That's usually the case.

Next, you draw the corner line and then connect the "dots" with orthogonal (vanishing) lines and vertical lines. In the drawing below you can see how the top block is above the horizon line. But there are others--one on the horizon line and the other below. 



Here's a step-by-step method to creating that last box, which is beneath the horizon line, often called bird's eye view.

Step One
As I stated, you have to first establish your horizon line and vanishing points. Then you draw your corner line (this should represent the height of your building or box.


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Step Two
Just as in one-point perspective, you have two planes here--the one on the right and other on the left. You draw vanishing lines from the top (and bottom) of the corner line to the point as demonstrated by the blue lines in the illustration. You've just created the sides of the building/box.

Step Three
Now that you have the sides done, you need to create the width by placing vertical lines between the vanishing lines. 


Step Four
So far, we have two walls up and running. But now we have to create the top. This can be tricky for some. Intuitively, I always wanted to draw the lines parallel to the bottom--but that was wrong. Instead we draw some more vanishing lines. For the right hand side of the box, you draw a line from the left-hand VP. to the right vertical line. For the left side, you draw a line from the right VP to the left vertical, as shown here.



Step Two
The final step is easy, just erase your lines and you have a box that's just below the horizon line.

What's neat about learning how to draw a box or building is your ability to create villages or even cities. During my perspective day-long workshop in March, that's just what we'll do. It is really a lot of fun when you understand the mechanics.



What's Coming Up!

Glastonbury Studios Weekly Classes
While my classes are full for this next term, I would suggest getting on the waitlist so that if someone can't attend, you may get a seat. I had one student who was on the waitlist for three sessions, but now is a permanent fixture in class. 

Winter Term begins week of January 22
Register by email:jjgoodell@gmail.com
Please note: Limited space per class. Payment reserves your seat.
See www.jillgoodell.com for details on any of the studio classes.

Pencil to Brush
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$75 per five-week term
Beginning to Intermediate
Full/Waitlist--email: jjgoodell@gmail.com

The Morning Draw
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$75 per five-week term
Full/Waitlist--email: jjgoodell@gmail.com

Pencil to Brush (Advanced)
Every Thursday evening
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
$75 per five-week term
Full/Waitlist--email: jjgoodell@gmail.com

Glastonbury Studios One-Day Workshops

All of my one-day workshops held at the studio are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and include all of the supplies as well as lunch of pizza and salad with soft drinks. The cost is $85. Class size is limited to nine students. Pre-registration is required. Only payment reserves your seat.


Drawing with Colored Pencils One-Day Workshop
Saturday, February 4  10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Learn how to use colored pencil by building up layers until you reach a brilliant, colorful surface. Basic strokes and blending techniques on a variety of grounds will be covered. All supplies provided, including lunch.

The Art of Perspective Saturday, March 4  10 a.m. to 4 p.m
Here's your chance to really get a handle on perspective. We will cover one-point and two point in depth. We'll also touch upon three-point. Learn how to draw buildings, rooms, bridges and so much more. All the supplies and tools are provided, including lunch.
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Now accepting reservations!
Sketching a Bit of England
Marlborough, England
September 3-10, 2017

Avebury, England
See details at: Sketching England

Sketch'n on the Go ™Tours
There is a $50 deposit to reserve your place.


Friday, December 16, 2016

Building a room in one-point perspective

So far we've covered one-point perspective in simplistic terms. This  month I'd like to complicate things a bit, which you will find isn't really that complicated once you've learned how it's done. 

We're going to build an inside room. Although it's far easier for me to do this with pencil, I decided to use one of my drawing programs instead for clarity purposes. I have to be honest though, my drawing ability on the computer isn't as good as with a pencil. So please forgive my rudimentary presentation.

Step One: The back wall
We're going to build a room from the front door out. I've drawn a rectangle, a window, door and clock.


Step Two: Determining the horizon line and vanishing point
Remember that the horizon line is determined by YOUR eye level. The vanishing point is where all the lines converge onto the horizon line--again from the viewers point of view.




Step three: Drawing the orthogonal line (also called vanishing or convergent lines)
In order to build the four walls, we need to draw the orthogonal lines (indicated with the dotted lines) from vanish point outward. Then we connect these lines by drawing a box that meets the lines.


Step Four: Ceiling, Floor, Sidewalls
Now, it's time to draw lines from the back wall on top of the orthogonal lines to create the walls, floor and ceiling.



Step Five: Side Window
With the walls created, we can now create a window (in perspective). Draw orthogonal lines from the vanishing point and by using vertical lines, create the dimension of the window.

Step Six: Creating a cheap boxy sofa
First draw two boxes to indicate how large the sofa will be. 


Step Six A: Creating a cheap boxy sofa (A)
From each corner of the box, draw orthogonal lines to the vanishing point.

Step Seven: Finishing it all.
Using vertical and horizontal lines finish the sofa.


Step eight: Bookcase and rug
By using the same method as in six and step seven, create a bookcase and rug. You can add more to the room if you like.



One-point perspective can be used to create all kinds of things like bridges and buildings. Next month, I'll introduce you to more fun stuff.
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Upcoming Events

Glastonbury Studios Weekly Classes
While my classes are full for this next term (January), I would suggest getting on the waitlist so that if someone can't attend, you may get a seat. I had one student who was on the waitlist for three sessions, but now is a permanent fixture in class. 

Winter Term begins week of January 22
Register by email:jjgoodell@gmail.com
Please note: Limited space per class. Payment reserves your seat.
See www.jillgoodell.com for details on any of the studio classes.

Pencil to Brush
Creating a drawing and finishing it with acrylic paints.
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$75 per five-week term
Beginning to Intermediate
Full/Waitlist--email: jjgoodell@gmail.com

The Morning Draw
Every Wednesday morning
Colored Pencil
10 am to 12:30 pm
$75 per five-week term
Full/Waitlist--email: jjgoodell@gmail.com

Pencil to Brush (Advanced)
Creating a drawing and finishing it with acrylic paints
Every Thursday evening
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
$75 per five-week term
Full/Waitlist--email: jjgoodell@gmail.com


Glastonbury Studios One-Day Workshops

All of my one-day workshops held at the studio are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and include all of the supplies as well as lunch of pizza and salad with soft drinks. The cost is $85. Class size is limited to nine students. Pre-registration is required. Only payment reserves your seat.


Why my workshops.I've been teaching professionally since 2006. I introduced the one-day workshop in 2010. My goal was and is to offer workshops, usually on a Saturday, that will introduce students to an art medium and/or technique without having to invest a lot of time and money. Too often one signs up for a class or workshop, spends a lot of money on tuition and/or supplies and finds out it's not right the right fit. In just six, short hours I give you an exceptional background in the medium and/or technique--no long term commitment, no expensive output.

Drawing with Colored Pencils One-Day Workshop

Saturday, February 4  10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Learn how to use colored pencil by building up layers until you reach a brilliant, colorful surface. Basic strokes and blending techniques on a variety of grounds will be covered. All supplies provided, including lunch.

The Art of Perspective 
Saturday, March 4  10 a.m. to 4 p.m

Here's your chance to really get a handle on perspective. We will cover one-point and two point in depth. We'll also touch upon three-point. Learn how to draw buildings, rooms, bridges and so much more. All the supplies and tools are provided, including lunch.


Sketch'n on the Go ™Tours

England in 2017 

Back by popular demand!


Sketching a Bit of England
Marlborough, England
September 3-10, 2017

See details at: Sketching England
There is a $50 deposit to reserve your place.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

One-Day Workshops Announcement

Next month I be continuing my discussion on perspective, but for now I want to make an announcement on changes that are being made regarding my one-day workshops.

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Things never stay the same, do they? Recently Portland Community College (PCC), Community Ed program, has decided to stop instructors from charging for art supplies used in class. Instead, students can bring their own or instructors can submit receipts for materials provided.

In a pickle—too many art supplies
That’s a problem for me because I have hundreds, if not thousands, of art supplies that I’ve bought over the years that we use in class. For instance, in the colored pencil class workshop, I offer over 1,000 pencils to use, not to mention the battery-operated erasers and sharpeners, expensive papers, blenders and so on. Simply said, I’m in a pickle. I could sell the products at a great loss, I could give them to a worthy school or I could hold my own drawing and painting workshops in my own studio.

Making relish—teaching out of my own studio
I like the idea of teaching in the studio. I’ve been conducting classes for years and have actually offered a few workshops here but I always felt a bit guilty competing with the school. Now that’s not an issue. So I’ve decided to take my pickle and make relish. I will be offering all of my one-day workshops at my studio except for Basic Drawing and Travel Sketching which will continue to be held at PCC. Here are some advantages. 

All my workshops will offer:
  • A nine-student maximum, which means you have a great teacher-student ratio
  • Most of the supplies. You may be asked to bring in a sketchbook. But nothing more. Just come to my workshop and find out if you like the medium, the subject, the technique.
  • You’ll be served a yummy lunch of cheese pizza*, salad and soft drinks. Coffee,tea and snacks will be available throughout the day.
  • A tuition of only $85 per person
  • Me, your instructor. As always my utmost desire is to see you succeed and have fun!

Check out my workshop offerings
I’ve created sort of a small catalog of the type of one-day workshops I will be offering. I will most likely offer one or two a quarter in my studio.  Please feel free to look it over. If you find one or two that you’re interested in, let me know. In the meantime, I will be announcing my quarterly workshops online  through this newsletter or website.


Download catalog here. Please note: large file, may be slow.

Thanks for all your support through the years
I have been very blessed to have you all as students and I hope to continue that experience in my new environment. Let me hear your thoughts by emailing at jjgoodell@gmail.com

*If you are on a restricted diet, please plan accordingly

Winter Workshops to be listed in December 2016


Monday, October 3, 2016

One-Point Perspective Part Two: Dividing Vertical Space



After spending 12 days on the New England to Quebec sketching holiday cruise with some lovely students, I'm now back in the studio. If you want to see some photos of the trip, go here. I'll be uploading some of my sketches soon.

100th post, 10-year anniversary

This month we are covering dividing vertical space in perspective. But before I begin, I’d like to celebrate a bit. This is my 100th newsletter post, plus the 10th anniversary of Glastonbury Studios! I wouldn’t have been able to do it without you. Thank you all. It’s been an absolutely wonderful adventure. I've grown a lot and I hope you have too. Wahoo!!!

Now onto the subject at hand:

Dividing Space
So far we've learned how to find the horizon line, the vanishing point and convergent lines. For instance, here's one of the photos from last month's issue with  all the perspective ingredients.



Notice in the picture how everything close to you is very clear and easy to see but as you go further toward the vanishing point (white dot), things get smaller and less distinguishable. How is that done? Well, you could guess-t-mate, which I often do when I'm drawing outside on one of my sketching holidays, fixing it all when I get back in the studio. You could also use your compass as a measuring tool to determine the distance, which is doable, but awkward. Or you could create dividing lines using the following method:

Dividing Vertical Space:
  • Step One:  Find your horizon line, convergent lines and vanishing point.
  • Step Two:  Draw your first vertical line, then find the  center. Draw a line from the center to the vanishing point. (In the example below, the horizon line and the mid-way point share the same space.)
  • Step Three:  Draw a second vertical line, which may be arbitrary.
Click to view larger graphic
©2016 by Jill Jeffers Goodell
  • Step Four:  Draw a line from A, crossing over mid-point (B) to C. Draw third vertical line.
  • Step Five:  Draw a line from D, crossing over mid-point (E) to F.   Draw your fourth vertical line.
  • Step Six:  Continue the same method until all vertical lines are built.

Click to view larger graphic
©2016 by Jill Jeffers Goodell
This may seem very tricky and hard, at first. But in this instance, practice makes perfect. In order to help you, I've uploaded a handout that you can use to practice. 

What I've shown you above is the "skeleton" of vertical spacing. Just for fun, I took the base layout and created a scene using gouache and marker.  Here's what it looks like:



Click to view larger graphic
©2016 by Jill Jeffers Goodell

I also have a fun handout that you can use to do the same thing. Color over the lines for the fence and then let your imagination run wild. 

One final thought. I was playing around with the division of space and wondered what it would look like with people instead of fences. Here's what I learned:

Click to view larger graphic
©2016 by Jill Jeffers Goodell


Now isn't that fun! But this only the beginning. We'll return to the fence again when we cover two-point perspective. For next month, let's build a room.

Until then, practice, practice, practice.


What's Coming Up!


Studio Classes
My studio classes have started and we've got a lively group this term. The next five-week term starts the first week of November. 

PCC Workshops
The Saturday workshops at PCC are usually held at the Sylvania campus from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please contact PCC for details: call 971-722-6266 or visit their website at: www.pcc.edu/community.Please note: Workshops fill up early. You can email me to see if you can get in if the workshop is full.

Sketching Cats
October 15

Visual Journaling
November 5

Realistic Drawing
November 19

Pen and Ink
December 3

Sketch'n on the Go ™ Tours
England in 2017 
Back by popular demand!


Sketching the English Village
Chiseldon, UK
September 3-10, 2017
There is a $50 deposit to reserve your place.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

One-Point Perspective

Source: James E Homans, New American Encyclopedia of
Social and Commercial Information (New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1908)

One-point perspective is fairly simple and straightforward. You have a horizon line (HL or EL--eye level) and one point (VP--vanishing point) on that line. All the parallel lines converge on this point, as illustrated above. Now let's  look at the same drawing with all its parts. The blue line is the horizon, the yellow lines are converging  and the red dot is the vanishing point.




Also notice that everything closer to you has more detail, whereas those objects further away become less distinct. 

The photo below is a very dramatic example of how everything goes to a point in the distance. I just love this picture. The photographer has truly captured that zooming feeling. Observe how the ties, rails and rock are so detailed immediately in front of us. Then move your eye further down the track and suddenly everything gets smaller and narrower--even the telephone poles. Also notice how the clouds nearest you are larger, while those in the distance get smaller. Believe it or not, drawing clouds using one-point perspective can be very, very helpful.




See how the lines all go toward the point in red.

More importantly, you can do so much with one-point perspective other than just railroad tracks. Check out all of these other examples.


Observe how all the yellow lines converge to the white vanishing point. By the way, when you determine where the vanishing point is located, you have actually found the horizon line (white horizontal line).

Can you see how this photo is in one-perspective?

In this photo, you can see that the pears are receding in the distance--although not that far away. But what else can you see? The horizon line and vanishing point are off the edge of the photo. This happens a lot. So how can you determine where the lines are going and where the vanishing point is located?

I'm glad you asked because I usually place a piece of paper behind the photo and then draw the convergent lines until they meet. That determines the vanishing point, which as I said before, establishes the horizon line. In this example, the horizon line is above the pears 

When it comes to still life or outdoor sketching, I use a protractor to determine my angles. It's a great little tool, especially if it comes with an arm. 
Source: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Angles-in-Math-Using-a-Protractor
Below is another example of one-point perspective but this time with a rolled cake. As I said, we're not limited to just structures and buildings when exploring perspective.Again the horizon line is above the cake.



But why bother even finding the perspective? Is it really necessary. Yes, it is. For one, it will help you create a better picture. How many times have you looked at a painting or a drawing and known things weren't right? Often it's because the perspective is off.

But there is another reason. I like to set up the lines to serve as a grid for me. I can visualize right off how all the elements fit together. For example, let's review that city photo again.


Everything is in line with everything else and most importantly, objects are more detailed and larger further away from vanishing point. All I have to do is pay attention to the vertical lines to help me create the building, lamps, windows and so on.

Things seem simple enough, but there are some challenges to one-point perspective and that's the distance between objects that are next to each other, such as with a fence. 

See the fence below? By now it should be easy to establish the convergent and horizon line, along with the vanishing point, but notice how the space between each post gets smaller into the distance. Although it's fairly easy to draw, it can be tricky. Learn how in our October issue.



What's Coming UP?

Back by popular demand: 
Sketching the English Village
Chiseldon, UK
September 3-10, 2017
There is a $50 deposit to reserve your place.

******************

Fall Studio classes begin  Week of September 25, 2016
Limited to six students per class.
Register by email:
jjgoodell@gmail.com
Please note: Limited space per class. Payment reserves your seat.
See www.jillgoodell.com for details on any of the studio classes.

Pencil to Brush
Every Tuesday morning
Drawing and Painting
10 am to 12:30 pm
$75 per five-week term

The Morning Draw (Full with waiting list)
Every Wednesday morning
Animals
10 am to 12:30 pm
$75 per five-week term

Fun with Acrylics
Every Thursday evening
Painting Structures
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
$75 per five-week term
For more information email: jjgoodell@gmail.com


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PCC Workshops
The Saturday workshops at PCC are usually held at the Sylvania campus from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please contact PCC for details: call 971-722-6266 or visit their website at: www.pcc.edu/community.
Please note: Workshops fill up early.

Basic Drawing Workshops
October 1

Sketching Cats
October 15

Visual Journaling
November 5

Realistic Drawing
November 19

Pen and Ink
December 3



Sketch'n on the Go ™Tours

England in 2017 

Back by popular demand!


Sketching the English Village
Chiseldon, UK
September 3-10, 2017
There is a $50 deposit to reserve your place.