Monday, June 8, 2020

Choosing the right papers/Openings in online drawing classes


Drawing and Painting Papers
There is a lot of confusion regarding what papers are good for drawing and what are good for painting. Plus, it doesn’t help when you go to the art store or look online and see so many choices. When preparing for this article, I went up to Dick Blick and found 97 different papers. Geez. That’s a lot of paper. Hopefully, this article will give you the basic generalities that may help you make some informed choices.

Paper has several different surfaces that accommodate several different media and tools. To choose wisely, you first have to consider the medium you are using and then match it to the appropriate paper.
If you are drawing with a #2 pencil and taking illustrative notes for later, you can use simple bond paper. Most of today’s copy paper is good enough to withstand pencil, several types of pens, light coloring with crayons and  colored pencil and ball point pens. But by no means do you add water to these pages because they will buckle.

Why? It’s all about weight and texture. While this is probably not the best place to write a treatise on this subject, it’s enough to say that not all papers are the same. Some papers are super thin, like vellum and tracing paper. Then there are drawing papers that can be textured, smooth and weigh anything from 20# (usually bond paper) to 300# (watercolor). There are newsprint papers that are rough, absorbent and fade in time (don’t use if you want to keep the drawings) and even sanded papers (good for pastels).

Weight lb vs gsm
Let us cover weight of the paper, as this causes the most confusion. Paper is classified by its weight, thickness based on a ream of paper (500 sheets). So if you were going to be buying the standard 140# watercolor paper, that is telling you that it’s heavier than 20# bond paper,

Now to really add more to the mix:  have you noticed papers are listed in lbs, gsm or both? What’s that?  In the United States, we use pounds to weigh paper, while the rest of the world using grams per square meters (GSM).

Knowing the difference is really important, especially when you want to use wet materials on paper. If it’s not heavy enough, the paper will buckle. Below you will find a list of papers at watercolor weights.
  • 90 lb (190 gsm),
  • 140 lb (300 gsm),
  • 260 lb (356 gsm),
  • 300 lb (638 gsm)


The general rule is:  paper that weighs less than 90# (190 gsm) shouldn’t be used with a wet medium. Having said that though, you should still tack down your 90# and 140# because the paper will most likely buckle without securing the edges. Three hundred pound paper is sturdy enough to withstand everything.
Below you will find a chart I found on the inside of the Canson XL recycled papers. It’s very informative and something you can use. Click on it to make it larger.



Cotton vs. wood pulp
As we know, especially if you live in Oregon, most papers are made out of wood pulp. That’s fine for copiers, office printers, books, stationary, and such. But when it comes to art, the distinction is big.  Although I do a lot of my sketching and quick-draw art on wood pulp paper, I set aside my important work for 100% cotton (or what’s called rag).

I recommend using 100% cotton (with a few exceptions) for both drawing and painting. Back in the early 2000s, I took a watercolor painting class. I was a novice so I bought all my supplies straight from the instructor’s material list, which included Strathmore watercolor paper. I really struggled in the class because I never was able to achieve that soft, blended watercolor look. It always seemed to come out splotchy.
Then I took a workshop at PCC, and the instructor introduced me to cotton paper. What a difference, the paint just flowed lovely over the paper. The reason the other paper didn’t work was that the paint was sitting on the paper instead of soaking into the fibers.

In time, I learned that I got better results when working on cotton paper even when drawing (pencil, pen, pastels, colored pencil, etc.). I usually use Stonehenge, Canson Edition, and Pentalic Nature Sketch. As for watercolor paper, I use 100% cotton hot press for drawing and cold press for painting, manufactured by Arches, Fabriano and Saunders-Waterford. Of course there are other brands that I can use, but the most important thing to look for is paper weight and what type of paper you are using.


Next month
I’ll cover types of art paper, smooth and textured, including some manufacturers and why I like them.

What coming up?

All classes are now online via Zoom
Tuesdays and Wednesdays
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
$90 per five-week session

Creating a Nature Journal from Your Window
Trees from crown to roots

Media: Pencil, pen, watercolor and gouache
Supply list provided upon registration

Tuesday mornings: June 16--July 14
Wednesday mornings: June 17-July 15 Full

To register, email: jjgoodell@gmail.com


Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Creativity While at Home--Online Classes: Nature Journaling from Your Window

Well, we're in the midst of "stay-at-home" orders. For those of us who don't have an essential job or who can work from home, we've been patiently following orders. That's good; it does save lives. As time goes by however, you may wonder how much longer can you manage to get through another day. I've read depression creeps in because we're stressed, grieving or just bored. Our American work ethic tells us to be productive, and if we can't, we're sort of at a loss.

This isn't new. There have been many plagues and quarantines before. In fact, my mother’s family was quarantined for a month because of scarlet fever in 1930s.  We have a history of people surviving quarantines and have had to face the same we are facing today (or even worse). With that in mind, some of us have even accomplished some rather powerful masterpieces because of it.

Take Shakespeare, it's claimed he wrote King Lear during isolation as well as Isaac Newton, who developed the laws of gravity and invented calculus all because of the plague. During the 1918 Flu, Edvard Munch painted Self Portrait with the Spanish Flu. He contracted the disease, but survived for another 25 years.



Isolation happens in life. Most of us have been rather lucky not to have done it often.  Mary Shelley, the author of the first science fiction work, Frankenstein, lived during “The Year without a Summer “ (also known as  "Poverty Year” and ”Eighteen Hundred & Frozen to Death”). While being confined in Switzerland with others, she wrote her masterpiece. By the way, if you want to take a few moments to learn how bad things were for everyone back  in 1815-16, go to this link. It makes me realize how awful life could get.

While in exile on Guernsey island, Victor Hugo completed his Les Miserables and Freda Kahlo did her first portrait while lying in bed recuperating from an accident. My point is when we are isolated, either through quarantine, exile or sickness, good things can happen.

So of course, as a drawing and painting teacher, I thought I could help with 30 days’ worth of projects. Let's draw or paint:
  1. An orange, apple, lemon
  2. A coffee cup
  3. A toaster
  4. A chair
  5. Your bedroom
  6. Your hand
  7. Your foot
  8. Jewelry
  9. Lamps
  10. Paint brushes, pencils in a cup holder
  11. Windows
  12. Stairs
  13. Pillows on a sofa
  14. A fried egg—sunny side-up or poached
  15. Comb (s)
  16. Stacks of books, using perspective technique
  17. Still life set-up created by you
  18. A hair brush/hair dryer
  19. Your pet (s)
  20. A kitchen mixer
  21. Lots of different breads
  22. A garden flower
  23. Bars of soap
  24. Landscape (cityscape) from  your window
  25. Your food pantry
  26. A bookcase
  27. Draped cloth over a stool or chair
  28. Water running from faucet (hint: take a photo)
  29. A finger nail
  30. A hat
Share with me your pieces if you like. Have a great month of May. Hang in there; we WILL get through this!


What coming up?

All classes are now online via Zoom
Tuesdays and Wednesdays
10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
$90 per five-week session

Creating a Nature Journal from Your Window

Media: Pencil, pen, watercolor and gouache
Supply list provided upon registration

Tuesday mornings: May 5-June 2
Wednesday mornings: May 6-June 3 Full

To register, email: jjgoodell@gmail.com


One more thought...
Interesting article from Reader’s  Digest:

Sunday, March 22, 2020

Online classes begin in May

Classes to migrate to online in May




Hope all of you are feeling okay and taking every precaution to stay well. I even made my own face mask (with felt liner) when they flew off the shelves.

Since we had our house up for sale (not anymore though) with plans to move out of the area, I was going to go online to teach my classes and workshops.  During the past month, I’ve been working with a core group of students who volunteered to help me toward this effort. Because of the virus, we decided to stop meeting in person and use Zoom to hold our classes. We had our first this Wednesday and it worked seamlessly. In fact, there seemed to be no difference in our social interaction and it became a nice break for everyone.

The plan
Right now we are up and running in the Wednesday class. I will be re-opening the Tuesday class in May. We will meet (via Zoom)  from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., study all forms of drawing (except charcoal) for $90 per five-week session or $18 a class. There is a minimum of four students and a max of 10, a limit to the US (International can come later) and eventually an offer for more drawing and painting classes on different days of the week. Workshops will follow.I want the classes to be smaller at first and then increase in size later.

·        The classes
All the classes and workshops will be taught in real time, totally live, no recordings. Here is my tentative format:
  •  Everyone joins the meeting via Zoom (it doesn’t cost you to use Zoom)
  • Meeting and  greeting--waiting for the whole group 
  • Class is called to order
  • Review of last week’s assignment
  • Introduction of the drawing technique and subject
  • Demonstration of both if necessary
  • About two hours of drawing with my help. Questions and advice can be asked here.
  • Show your work  with possible critique (if you want).
  • Next week’s subject will be discussed 
  • Photos are uploaded on my cloud for you to download—but you are encouraged to do the project in class. Most people don’t finish all their work in class anyway, so that’s usually the homework.
Why not start the online classes immediately? Maybe?
I still have some things to accomplish and don’t want to offer something to my students that hasn’t been totally thought out. However, if I have enough people interested, I can always be persuaded to try it earlier than May. Let me know: jjgoodell@gmail.com.

Here’s a sample.Along with me seeing you and you seeing me, I am able to give you a very good demonstration(s) in class. Here’s one I have recorded.







Want to learn more? 
Contact me through email: jjgoodell@gmail.com

Monday, December 2, 2019

Holiday art idea and workshop

Glastonbury Studios

Reminder!
Pen and Ink workshop with colored inks and Brusho is scheduled for this Saturday, December 7th. Just in time for the holidays! Learn pen and ink techniques using India ink colored ink and Brusho. All the supplies are included along with lunch! Great for gift cards, illustrations and journals. 10 am to 4 pm. Contact Jill at jjgoodell@gmail.com.
Thank you for supporting me throughout the years. I especially want to thank those long-time students who have been with me for over 10 years. Sometimes, I have to pinch myself to make sure I'm not dreaming. You have all made this the best 14 years of my life. I hope you all will strive to continue fine-tuning your basic skills.

Since we are celebrating the holidays, I thought I'd give you a simple lesson on how to make a Christmas tree in less than 15 minutes. A few years ago, I sent this card out to my friends and family.
It's simple, fast and festive. Back then, I used watercolor, but today I'm going to use Tombow Dual Brush pens.
Notice that on the left side, the pen has a brush and on the right a bullet tip of the same color. These are highly versatile, water-based pens. You can paint with them as well as illustrate. Be careful though because they are water-based, which means you can experience smearing if you used a wet brush on top.

Another pen brush that I use is the Faber-Castel Pitt Artist Brush Pens. These do not have the same large brush, but can serve as a pen as well as a brush. They are not dual.
Recently, they have brought out the Big brush. I haven't personally used it, but the brush does look considerably larger.
The biggest advantage of using Pitt is the pen is permanent, using Indian ink. So when the ink is down and dry, there's no smearing.

So lets begin with the first marking. Again, I am using the Tombow Dual Brush in this exercise.

Step one
Create the base tree. Here I am using Tombow 177 on watercolor paper, hot press (smooth) paper .Now understand this is a free-style drawing, so one tree will be different from another. Notice to the right I am showing the marks I made, along with a zig-zag.
Step two
Now I added color #493.
 
Step three
I added #N60 (lt. purple) and #158 (lt. green)
 Step four and final
Using the bullet tip #N23 (black), I added some details (I actually used an ink pen #01 but it wasn't bold enough). The trunk was #879 and undergrowth  was #177. Finally, I placed red balls, using a red paint pen. In my original I used glitter paint, but no longer have it.
 
 
As in real life, no Christmas tree is the same when drawing free-style. But that's the fun part. By the way, for those who want to know the type face I used, it is Papyrus.

I hope this holiday season will bring you all the joy and happiness you deserve!

Keep Playing with Art!

Questions or comments please go to:
jjgoodell@gmail.com

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Fall 2019 Workshops

Give yourself a fun day break with  Art!

Come and enjoy one of our informative and skill-based workshops. We supply most of the materials, so no long list to contend with. Plus we even provide lunch (pizza and salad). All of our workshops are held at Glastonbury Studios in Tigard from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost $90 per person, unless stated differently. Pre-registration is required. To register or for more information, contact me at: jjgoodell@gmail.com or 503.524.6981.
Fall Flowers and Leaves
Saturday, November 16
Learn the basics to sketching flowers and leaves, using pen and ink along with watercolor. We will delve deeply into the anatomy of both, including pursuing some dissections. Bring a 90#, or heavier sketchbook. All other supplies and lunch provided.
 
Pen and Ink—
The traditional way

Saturday, December 7 Learn pen and ink, using India ink and watercolor. Explore different methods like hatching, crosshatching, stippling and more. Bring a 90#, or heavier sketchbook. All other supplies are included. 
Reminder: Winter classes begin week of January 5, 2020.
Plus!
Sketch'n on the Go
Aix en Provence Workshop
has moved to September, 2020 (more to come)

Wednesday, October 23, 2019


I haven’t fallen off the edge of the world or building.


Instead, I’ve been incredibly busy with a new project:  getting our house ready for a sale and move. We’ve been working on it since mid-summer. The hardest part was breaking down the classroom and office and returning the space to a living room and dining room. Finally, that’s done.

So what happens to the classes and workshops?
For now nothing will change. My home-studio classroom is now in its original space—the front room (den) and can hold 10 in a pinch, but I’m still limiting classes to six people. Once the dust settles here, I plan on hosting a workshop in November (Drawing Birds) and December (Pen & Ink). Travel sketching workshops will continue as always—this next year we’re headed to Aix en Provence, France, in late April (see below for class and workshop details). My website will be updated soon.

Where are you moving to?
That’s a good question. We originally thought we were going to Port Townsend or Sequim, WA, which may still happen, but we’re now investigating the Vancouver and Camas areas.

Will you stop teaching?
Nah, I’ll won’t stop (until I drop). I will be converting everything to online classes, which I am in the process of learning how to operate. In fact, this new direction will be far better than my limited brick and mortar set up. Here’s why:
  • It will be live
  • I can offer the class to 20 students per session
  • You can live anywhere, no commuting needed
  • No concern about weather (unless your power goes out)
  • You can learn in your pj’s.
  • You can meet new people. Since the program is online and live, you will be able to share ideas, ask questions as is done in any other class.
Will you continue your newsletters?
Yes, just give me at least another month and I’ll be back in the saddle again, seeking new and interesting art horizons to discuss. In fact, any subject ideas are always welcomed!

What's Coming Up?
Fall Classes


Further information contact me:
jjgoodell@gmail.com


Art of Sketching Begins  10/29 Two openings
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun.
Mixed media
Limited supply list
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term

The Morning Draw Begins 10/30 Full class
We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques.
Mixed media
Limited supply list.
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term

Fall Art Workshops
All of our workshops are held at Glastonbury Studios in Tigard from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost $90 per person, unless stated differently. Pre-registration is required.To register or for more information, please contact me at jjgoodell@gmail.com.

Saturday, November 16
Sketching Flowers

Saturday, December 7
Pen and Ink—the traditional way


2020 Sketch'n on the Go!™ Workshops
Mark your calendar.

Every year I take students to different locations. In 2019, it was Ireland. In 2020, I’m planning a trip to Aix en Provence. We are now in the planning stage, but will have everything in place shortly.

Workshop Tuition
The workshop tuition is $800 per person and covers a week of instruction. Hotel rooms, transportation costs, food, entrance fees etc. are additional.  If you are taking a friend or partner, the companion fee is $250.

Travel Agent
For the travel side, I work with Barb Gossack, owner of the Expedia Cruise Ship Centers in Wilsonville (yes a brick and mortar location). For more information on any of these trips, you can contact her at BGossack@CruiseShipCenters.com

 Aix en Provence 
Itinerary and Hotel TBD
April 26-May 2, 2020


Monday, July 8, 2019

Workshop openings July, August, September

Workshop openings
available at
Glastonbury Studios

Studio workshops are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and include lunch

Saturday, July 13  Drawing Fun Bugs

Beetles, butterflies, dragonfly, etc. $90
Two-Day Workshop  Saturday & Sunday August 3 & 4
"Art Journaling from the Heart" $199

September 1-8,2019
Sketching Dublin and Beyond (see below)


Spots available due to last minute cancellation!

Sketching Dublin and Beyond Workshop

Sunday, September 1- Sunday, September 8, 2019
Eight Days & Seven Nights Workshop Tuition: $800*
For one week, we'll unpack once and sketch Dublin, Galway, Belfast and Malahide and it's charming castle.  We will stay at the Castleknock Hotel, just outside Dublin. The accommodations include a nicely appointed room with daily breakfast, indoor swimming pool, biking and walking trails, golfing and only minutes away from the local bus to take us into town.
Fun sign in Galway (west coast of Ireland)

We'll meet everyday at 8:30 a.m. in the hotel lobby. From there we will leave for our sketching destinations, from the west coast of Ireland to the east coast. Once on location, we will sketch for three to four hours, taking in the sites, and yes! there will also be time for you to wander on your own.

The workshop tuition is $800 for the week. Interested, contact me: jjgoodell@gmail.com For more details click the button below or go to:
https://sketchingdublin.blogspot.com/
Find Out More