Sunday, February 3, 2019

February 2019 Newsletter

My little, very small sketchbook
and how it solves lots of daily art issues


Back a few years ago, when I was teaching sketching in England, one of my students whispered in my ear that several of her classmates were really intimidated by their sketchbook. Although I was a bit surprised, I actually knew what she meant. I've been there. Sometimes it's just hard to start. If you're a writer or an artist, the white sheet or canvas is difficult to face. What's more, even when you do start, you worry it's not good enough.


To my delight the whisperer suggested, I come up with a "sloppy copy" booklet that students could just scribble in. But more importantly, feel free to put pencil to paper, not actually caring if the sketch becomes a Rembrandt or a child-like rendering. At the time, I thought it was a good idea and filed it away.


Fast forward to last year when my husband and I were in Barcelona. Of course, I brought all my sketching stuff, which I carried in my purse. Then one day, I passed by a shop that was selling Barcelona souvenirs, among them a a small sketchbook. Hmm. I bought it and proceeded to do all my work, in pencil, for the rest of the vacation.



Barcelona sketchbook

One of my sketches--very loose indeed

Happily, I made a new discovery. Not only was I stripped of that concern that my sketchbook wouldn't look good enough, I was freed up to do anything I wanted. All of my sketches didn't take more than 15 minutes to finish and at that, I'd say most of them were only five minutes or less. The sketchbook was small enough for a pocket and accompanied by a mechanical pencil, I was set to sketch whatever and whenever I wanted.  No matter if I were on a bus, train or boat, I could pull it out and start sketching. I was in love! (okay, I spread my love around for all kinds of things--people, objects, food, dogs...)


With this practice in hand, I bought everyone 
 who took my Canadian sketching workshop a similar small sketchbook (3.5 x 5.5, 24 pages).  I can only say we all experienced so much freedom! For me, I actually filled up the entire book with quick drawings and lots of short reminder notes. I believe everyone did the same. 

Later on in the week, we all gathered in a room on the ship (it was a cruise) and spent six hours working on our "real" journals, redrawing the scene(s), inking and using watercolor washes. The secret to the success was that we all took a picture first of everything we were drawing, then did a quick sketch. When we sat down to record everything in our sketching journals it was far less intimidating because we were recounting our adventure from previously made rough sketches.




You can probably see above why taking a photo is so important. My quick sketch of Ben Franklin's grave monument was very short and fat. But by referring back to my photo I saw the true proportion. Using both references allowed me to create a very pleasing sketch.



There are lots of small sketchbooks on the market.

Of course, there are lot of choices. I like using the Moleskine book with a brown craft cover. They come in packs of three, which can easily cover three trips or just daily sketching. It comes with a small envelope in the back for small items such as tickets, and receipts of little items one picks up along the way.
I also sketch in field books or pocket notebooks, which are used a lot by scientists and other professionals for field work. The books usually have a ruler printed inside and other notations. They come in three and five packets and can be filled with blank, graph or dotted line paper.





Finally, I use a couple of thicker books, especially in my purse for when I get bored in the doctor's office, waiting for someone or going on a short trip. My favorites are Daler Rowney, which is really inexpensive at Walmart and Moleskine. They both have at least 70-80 pages, 32# paper, an internal pocket, ribbon bookmark and elastic closure. These are sturdier than the paper covered books.



In my classes, I now give every student one of the smaller sketchbooks. The homework is to sketch one item per week--nothing complicated, just a quick visual note. We're also learning how to sketch in one-minute, two minute, three-minute sequences. It's amazing how quickly your internal critic disappears when there is little time to "bad-mouth" your work.

This may all sound silly, but I suggest you buy one of the small sketchbooks and sketch something everyday in pencil. You'll surprise yourself how good you will get.

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What's coming up!!


Seats available in all classes and workshops. 

Workshop Opportunities

Glastonbury Studios One-Day Workshops
All studio workshops are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Includes most supplies and lunch. Sign up early. Most workshops fill up quickly.The cost is $90. Class size is limited to ten students. Pre-registration is required. Only payment reserves your seat.


Saturday, February 9
Drawing Birds
Here’s an introductory course to sketching birds from skeleton to feather. We’ll cover many different birds, using pencil, ink and watercolor wash. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mix Media with you to class. All other supplies, including lunch, provided.

Saturday March 23
Drawing the Face
One-Day Workshop
In this workshop we will explore all types of faces, including humans and other animals. I will show you how to truly see the face, use facial measurements to gain a likeness, develop shading to create form and how to draw realistic hair/fur/feathers. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mixed Media with you to class and I’ll supply the rest, including lunch.


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Sketch'n-on-the-Go Series™
Presents
"Sketching Dublin & Beyond"



Sunday, September 1- Sunday, September 8, 2019
Eight Days & Seven Nights Workshop
Tuition: $800*  
Interested? 
Go to Dublin Workshop.

Contact me:

Winter 2019 Classes 


Just a warning. The students in these classes are 
very liberal-minded, fun-loving women!
Be prepared to laugh, love and live a lot.

Classes begin week of February 17. Come join the fun, while learning how to draw and/or paint in the Glastonbury Studios classes. To sign up for classes in my studio, please email me at jjgoodell@gmail.com. Five-week term; limited to eight students per class. Only registration and payment secures your seat.





Art of Sketching 2/19
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun. We'll be  using pen and ink with watercolor washes. Limited supply list
The Landscape
(ink and watercolor)
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

The Morning Draw 2/20
We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques. Limited supply list.
The Landscape
(oil pastels, ink and watercolor)
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available
Page from Art Journal
Art Journaling  2/21
Drawing, painting, collage, writing, mixed media. Limited supply list.
Every Thursday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Seats available

For more information email:
jjgoodell@gmail.com


 “Every artist was first an amateur”

Ralph Waldo Emerson


Thursday, January 3, 2019

I cannot pee
I cannot chew
I cannot screw
My memory shrinks
My hearing stinks
No sense of smell
I look like hell
My body’s drooping
Have trouble pooping
The Golden Years have come at last
The Golden Years can kiss my ass


You're Only Old Once!
by Dr. Seuss







The Day the Giggles Died
I remember the day I learned about the passing of Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991) or Dr. Seuss. My son, who was only two, and I were at an ice cream shop. I was truly taken aback. While I never read Dr. Seuss as a child, I had read most of his children's books to our son. Wow, what entertaining readings they were.

For years, I thought Seuss had only written the words and commissioned the drawings. Then, I learned he was the master of all the books. Interestingly, his past foretold his future. As a young child his mother would speak to him in rhyme, a wonderful way to learn poetic meter. ll.

Obviously, he was a good student, attending Dartmouth and then going to Oxford to study English Literature. His plan was to get a PhD. But while attending, he met his future first wife, Helen Palmer, who examined his "notebooks." They were filled with scribbling and doodling. Palmer saw that he had a passion not only in writing but perhaps more so in drawing. That's when she encouraged him to drop the literature route and go for his art. 

Fortunately, back in the States he landed assignments with Vanity Fair. Life, Saturday Evening Post and eventually with the advertising agency, McCann Erickson. After a somewhat lucrative career as a cartoonist, Seuss wrote and illustrated his first children's book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, inspired by the rhythmic sound of a ship's engine.

As with so many authors' stories, the book was rejected 27 times. Seuss was so disappointed, he decided to go home and destroy everything. On his way, he met up with a long time friend from Dartmouth, who by chance, had just recently been hired by Vanguard Press in their children's department. And well, the rest is history. The book was published in 1937. Just think about what would have happened if he had passed by a hour later or earlier, or walked on the other side  of the street.


While we know Seuss as a famous author, he did far more. Before and during WWII, he created political cartoons. I had never heard of America First until recent times, but there was such a named movement before the war. They were isolationists who did not want to participate in any European conflicts. Obviously Seuss did not think kindly of these people as the following cartoons demonstrate:







This one appeared a few days before Pearl Harbor.
Seuss joined the Army as a captain and headed up the Animation Department of the Air Force's motion picture unit. Near the end of the war, he and Frank Capra (It' a Wonderful Life producer), created two short films:  Your Job in Germany and Our Job in Japan, both to prepare our troops for occupation. Notably General MacArthur thought the Japanese film was too lenient and barred it. Of course, when watching these films, we all have to consider the time frame in which they were made.

After the war, Seuss and his wife moved to La Jolla, California, and he continued writing his children's books. In 1954 he was approached to help with school literacy, noting that most books being produce then were considered boring to most kids. Ellsworth Spaulding  director of the education division for Houghton Mifflin, asked Seuss to write a book that included 250 words most first graders should learn. Thus the birth of the Cat in the Hat.

In total, Dr. Seuss created at least 42 books. Along with his cartoons and books, he also was a prolific artist. See the link here. He passed away in September 1991 of oral cancer. He is still very missed.

“Today you are You, that is truer than true. 

There is no one alive who is Youer than You.


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What's Coming Up!


Winter 2019 Classes 

Classes begin second week of January. 
Come join the fun, while learning how to draw and/or paint in the Glastonbury Studios classes. To sign up for classes in my studio, please email me at jjgoodell@gmail.com. Five-week term; limited to six students per class. Only registration and payment secures your seat.


Art of Sketching
Learning to sketch actually improves your drawing skills; besides it’s amazingly fun. We’ll be covering all sorts of subjects (traveling, nature, flowers, animals, people), using pen and ink with watercolor washes. Limited supply list
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Sign up for wait list

The Morning Draw
 We will be exploring a variety of subjects and drawing techniques. Limited supply list.
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Sign up for wait list

Art Journaling 
Drawing, painting, collage, writing, mixed media. Limited supply list.
Every Thursday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 per five-week term
Sign up for wait list


For more information email:
jjgoodell@gmail.com


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Workshop Opportunities



Glastonbury Studios One-Day Workshops
All studio workshops are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Includes most supplies and lunch. Sign up early. Most workshops fill up quickly.The cost is $90. Class size is limited to ten students. Pre-registration is required. Only payment reserves your seat.

2019 First Quarter Workshops

Saturday, February 9
Drawing Birds
Here’s an introductory course to sketching birds from skeleton to feather. We’ll cover many different birds, using pencil, ink and watercolor wash. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mix Media with you to class. All other supplies, including lunch, provided.

Saturday March 23
Drawing the Face
One-Day Workshop
In this workshop we will explore all types of faces, including humans and other animals. I will show you how to truly see the face, use facial measurements to gain a likeness, develop shading to create form and how to draw realistic hair/fur/feathers. Bring a Strathmore Visual Journal/Mixed Media with you to class and I’ll supply the rest, including lunch.

---------------------------------------------------

2019
Glastonbury Studios
Sketch'n-on-the-Go Series™
Presents
"Sketching Dublin & Beyond"



Sunday, September 1- Sunday, September 8, 2019
Eight Days & Seven Nights Workshop
Tuition: $800*  
Interested? Contact me:

----------------------------------------------------

PCC Workshop
Beginning Drawing
March 9, 2019
Sylvania Campus
For more information go to this link


Friday, November 2, 2018


Class Openings
Glastonbury Studios


I have four new openings for classes in the Fall Session, starting next week. Why not take the plunge and try them?
 
Fall Classes 2018
Glastonbury Studios Classes
Five-Week Session  
Begins First week of November

Pencil to Brush-- Begins November 6
Still Life
Every Tuesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80  One opening

The Morning Draw--Begins November 7
Still Life
Every Wednesday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80 Two openings
 
Art Journaling Begins November 8
Drawing, collage, writing, mixed media
Every Thursday morning
10 am to 12:30 pm
$80  
One opening

If you're interested, please email me at
jjgoodell@gmail.com

First come, first served